maitake mushroom

maitake

“Maitake” means dancing mushroom in Japanese. The mushroom is said to have gotten its name after people danced with happiness upon finding it in the wild, such are its incredible healing properties.

Also known as hen of the woods or Grifola frondosa, maitake mushrooms are a type of edible fungi that are native to China but are also grown in Japan and North America. They are commonly found in clusters at the base of maple, oak or elm trees and can grow to over 100 pounds, earning them the title “king of the mushrooms.”

These mushrooms have a unique, frilly appearance, a delicate texture and an earthy flavor that works well in many different dishes, from burgers to stir-fries and beyond.

PRIMARY MICRO NUTRIENTS Vitamin D, Potassium, Copper, and Vitamins B1, B2, B3
SECONDARY MICRO NUTRIENTS Zinc, Selenium, Vitamin B5 and Folate
NUTRITIONAL HIGHLIGHTS and NOTES
  • Significant source of Vitamin D
  • Good dietary absorption of anti-cancer compounds when eaten in food
  • Adaptogenic and significantly boosts immune system and builds immune reserves
  • Hepaprotective
  • May lower blood glucose and blood pressure
FUNCTIONAL BENEFITS  Anti-cancer:

  • Provides cellular protection from becoming cancerous
  • Enhances immune ability to seek out and destroy cancer cells
  • Helps cancer cells regain control of cell division and programmed cell death (apoptosis)
  • Helps prevent spreading of cancer (metastasis
  • Helps treat cancer patients and reduce side effects of chemotherapy
PHYTONUTRIENTS
  • Polysaccharides shown to fight formation and growth of cancer tumors
  • Immune enhancing betaglucans
    • Bind to receptors on the outer membranes of macrophages and other White Blood Cells (WBCs), including natural killer cells and cytotoxic T cells (especially important in preventing and fighting cancer because they attack tumor cells directly)
    • Excite WBCs triggering chain reaction leading to increased immune activity – increased ability of macrophages to engulf and destroy cancer cells, microbes and other antigens (nb binding of macrophages stimulates production of signally proteins such as interleukin-1, interleukin-2 and lymphokines that stimulate immune cells, leading to enhanced immune activity)
    • Stimulates production of WBCs in bone marrow
DANGERS
  • Chemical treatment whilst growing – buy organic
  • Moderate oxalates (calcium absorption and kidney stones)
  • Significant source of purines (broken down to form uric acid that can lead to excess uric acid and kidney problems)
  • Excess can cause diarrhea, bloating
  • Allergy food – may cause skin rashes
RDA Mushroom Maitake
Nutrient Unit per 100g
g 3700 90.37 2.4%
Energy kcal 2600 31 1.2%
Protein g 90 1.94 2.2%
Total lipid (fat) g 87 0.19 0.2%
Carbohydrate, by difference g 224 6.97 3.1%
Fiber, total dietary g 38 2.7 7.1%
Sugars, total g 2.07
Minerals
Calcium, Ca mg 1000 1 0.1%
Iron, Fe mg 8 0.3 3.8%
Magnesium, Mg mg 420 10 2.4%
Phosphorus, P mg 700 74 10.6%
Potassium, K mg 470 204 43.4%
Sodium, Na mg 1
Zinc, Zn mg 11 0.75 6.8%
Copper, Cu mg 0.9 0.252 28.0%
Manganese, Mn mg 2.3 0.059 2.6%
Selenium, Se µg 55 2.2 4.0%
Vitamins
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid mg 90 0 0.0%
Thiamin mg 1.2 0.146 12.2%
Riboflavin mg 1.3 0.242 18.6%
Niacin mg 16 6.585 41.2%
Pantothenic acid mg 5 0.27 5.4%
Vitamin B-6 mg 1.7 0.056 3.3%
Folate, total µg 400 21 5.3%
Choline, total mg 51.1
Betaine mg
Vitamin B-12 µg 2.4 0 0.0%
Vitamin A, IU IU 5000 0 0.0%
Vitamin E, total mg 15 0.01 0.1%
Vitamin D IU 600 1123 187.2%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone) µg 120 0 0.0%

RDA – Recommended Dietary Amount recommendations are based upon calculations for a 40 year old very active man that I have adapted from USDA’s Dietary Intake Guidelines. Using this link you can make your own calculations

Adapted from:

Balch, P.A. (2002). Prescription for herbal healing. New York, NY: Avery books

Murray, M. (2005). Encyclopedia of Healing Food. New York, N.Y.: Atria Books

USDA food database: http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/

Other information sources:

World’s Healthiest Foods – an excellent online food and nutrition encyclopedia

Self Nutrition Data: an online nutrient breakdown of foods

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