potatoes

PatatesWas there ever a time, maybe in your childhood,  when you got in trouble for someone else’s mischief – when you were judged as  guilty by association? Then you understand the plight of the potato. Potatoes have gotten a bad rap for far too long. As victims of the war on foods potatoes have been blamed for ills they never caused. Potatoes are wrongly accused of contributing to obesity, diabetes, cancer, Candida overgrowth, and many other conditions, while in truth these miraculous tubers can reverse illnesses. That’s right! Potatoes are actually good for people with diabetes, because they help stabilise blood sugar.

We should also be careful not to lump potatoes in with the fear of grains and processed foods. If you’re avoiding “white” foods such as white rice, white flour, white sugar, and  dairy products (such as milk, cheese,  yogurt, and cream), don’t cut out potatoes! After all, a potato in its whole, natural state isn’t white – it’s covered in nutrient-rich red, brown,  gold,  blue, or purple skin. This skin of the potato is one of the best nutrition sources on  the planet – a miracle of amino acids, proteins, and phy­tonutrients. Only once you cut into a potato might you see a white interior which doesn’t mean it’s lacking in value. After all, we don’t think of apples, onions, or radishes as white and therefore useless, even though when you cut into them, they’re devoid of colour. And a cultivated blueberry is colourless inside (whereas wild blueberries are saturated with colour inside and out); this doesn’t mean it shows up on white food lists.

TIPS

  • Potatoes are one instance where it’s definitely best to seek out organic
  • When preparing potatoes to eat, the best way to maximise the healing benefits and keep the nutrients intact is to steam them. If you normally eat your potatoes with butter, cheese, sour cream, try avocado as a dairy replacement
  • After you’ve steamed a batch of potatoes, set some aside to cool. Later, pull them out of the fridge, slice or cube them, and add them to a spinach or kale salad. The enzymes from the potatoes will enhance the healing alkaloids in the leafy greens, maximising the medicinal power of the meal
  • Whenever you’re celebrating, make potatoes part of the meal. Whether it’s a wedding, engagement, birthday, graduation, promotion, holiday, or other festive occasion, including potatoes will support and enhance the joyful emotions and help sustain them for days
PRIMARY MICRO NUTRIENTS Vitamin C, Copper, Potassium, Vitamin B1, B3, B5, B6
SECONDARY MICRO NUTRIENTS Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Manganese
NUTRITIONAL HIGHLIGHTS Moderate protein content – contains essential amino acid lysine which is often lacking in other grains.
FUNCTIONAL BENEFITS
NUTRITIONAL NOTES Most nutrients, fiber and protein are found in the skins

Nightshade family plant – related to Bell Peppers, Eggplants, Tomatoes

High pesticide levels; Nightshade (Arthritis);

RDA – Recommended Dietary Amount recommendations are based upon calculations for a 40 year old very active man that I have adapted from USDA’s Dietary Intake Guidelines. Using this link you can make your own calculations

Potatoes, boiled, cooked in skin 1 potato (2-1/2″ dia) = 136.0g
Nutrient Unit RDA per 100 g % RDA % RDA
Water g 76.98 104.69
Energy kcal 87 118
Protein g 1.87 2.54
Total lipid (fat) g 0.1 0.14
Carbohydrate, by difference g 20.13 27.38
Fiber, total dietary g 1.8 2.4
Sugars, total g 0.91 1.24
Sucrose 0.19 0.26
Glucose (dextrose) 0.34 0.46
Fructose 0.29 0.39
Minerals
Calcium, Ca mg 1000 5 0.5% 7 0.7%
Iron, Fe mg 8 0.31 3.9% 0.42 5.3%
Magnesium, Mg mg 420 22 5.2% 30 7.1%
Phosphorus, P mg 700 44 6.3% 60 8.6%
Potassium, K mg 470 379 80.6% 515 109.6%
Sodium, Na mg 4 5
Zinc, Zn mg 11 0.3 2.7% 0.41 3.7%
Copper, Cu mg 0.9 0.188 20.9% 0.256 28.4%
Manganese, Mn mg 2.3 0.138 6.0% 0.188 8.2%
Selenium, Se µg 55 0.3 0.5% 0.4 0.7%
Fluoride, F µg 49.4 67.2
Vitamins
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid mg 90 13 14.4% 17.7 19.7%
Thiamin mg 1.2 0.106 8.8% 0.144 12.0%
Riboflavin mg 1.3 0.02 1.5% 0.027 2.1%
Niacin mg 16 1.439 9.0% 1.957 12.2%
Pantothenic acid mg 5 0.52 10.4% 0.707 14.1%
Vitamin B-6 mg 1.7 0.299 17.6% 0.407 23.9%
Folate, total µg 400 10 2.5% 14 3.5%
Choline, total mg 13.5 18.4
Betaine mg 0.2 0.3
Vitamin B-12 µg 2.4 0 0.0% 0 0.0%
Carotene, beta µg 2 3
Vitamin A, IU IU 5000 3 0.1% 4 0.1%
Lutein + zeaxanthin µg 10 14
Vitamin E, total mg 15 0.01 0.1% 0.01 0.1%
Vitamin D IU 600 0 0.0% 0 0.0%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone) µg 120 2.2 1.8% 3 2.5%
Lipids
Fatty acids, total saturated g 0.026 0.035
Fatty acids, total monounsaturated g 0.002 0.003
Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated g 0.043 0.058
Amino Acids
Tryptophan g 0.029 0.039
Threonine g 0.068 0.092
Isoleucine g 0.076 0.103
Leucine g 0.112 0.152
Lysine g 0.114 0.155
Methionine g 0.03 0.041
Cystine g 0.024 0.033
Phenylalanine g 0.083 0.113
Tyrosine g 0.069 0.094
Valine g 0.105 0.143
Arginine g 0.086 0.117
Histidine g 0.041 0.056
Alanine g 0.057 0.078
Aspartic acid g 0.457 0.622
Glutamic acid g 0.314 0.427
Glycine g 0.056 0.076
Proline g 0.067 0.091
Serine g 0.081 0.11

Adapted from:

Murray, M. (2005). Encyclopedia of Healing Food. New York, N.Y.: Atria Books

USDA food database: http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/

Other information sources:

World’s Healthiest Foods – an excellent online food and nutrition encyclopedia

Self Nutrition Data: an online nutrient breakdown of foods

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